» Lady Georgette’s Brandy Chocolate Truffles

Lady Georgette’s Brandy Chocolate Truffles

This post first appeared as a December 10th, 2012 feature on Avon Romance.

“Though she would never admit it to polite Society, Lady Georgette Thorold hated brandy almost as much as she hated husbands. So it was the cruelest of jokes when she awoke with nary a clue to her surroundings, smelling like one and pressed up against the other.”

So begins my upcoming debut novel, the Victorian-set What Happens in Scotland, which will be released February 26, 2013. A bottle of brandy and a handsome Scotsman lead our widowed heroine, Lady Georgette Thorold, to do some very interesting things.

Even if she can’t precisely remember them.

To celebrate Lady Georgette’s forgotten night of debauchery, I present to you my own personal take on Brandy Chocolate Truffles. Any well-bred lady—even one lacking basic culinary skills or a personal chef—could make these easy mouthfuls of sin! They are worth a go, especially if you can find a handsome Scotsman to share them with.

· The recipe begins with a batch of brownies made according to box instructions. (Gasp! So easy! Your snobbish friends won’t know if you don’t tell them!) I admit some partiality to Ghirardelli Chocolate Supreme Brownie mix. These brownies are rich and decadent, and almost (but not quite) a dark chocolate.

· Once the brownies have cooled, I take a fork and vent my frustration about not actually being able to afford a personal chef by poking small holes all over the top. Next I take a good French brandy (say, about a quarter cup per batch. Feel free to use more if you are having one of “those” days). I sprinkle the brandy by scant spoonfuls evenly over the brownies, then place the brownie-brandy mixture in the refrigerator to chill completely (overnight works best).

· Once the mixture has chilled, I roll a spoonful into ¾ to 1 inch balls with my hands. I usually roll the entire batch before beginning the next step, and chill them again.

· Melt your favorite chocolate candy coating by whichever method you prefer. I use Kroger Brand Candy Coating Chocolate (found in the baking aisle). This comes in an oh-so-convenient microwavable tray that makes melting a snap. Er…that is, if proper ladies actually used microwaves. Once melted, I keep the warmed chocolate in a fondue pot so it stays at the right temperature. I dip the chilled brownie balls in the heated chocolate, and then cool them on waxed paper.

· Once the truffles have hardened, I put a whimsical bit of white chocolate candy on the top. I buy the tubes that just require you to heat and squeeze (I get these from my local candy-making shop, or you can buy them here.)

· 2 boxes of brownies, 3 trays of candy coating, and 1 white chocolate writing tube make 60 truffles.

I almost feel as if I should apologize for revealing such a simple secret recipe, but then, a lady never apologizes if she can help it. These delicious truffles will have people thinking you are either a culinary genius or retain one on staff.

That is, if you choose to share them. These are so good you might just decide they are the perfect accompaniment to your own night of debauchery.

 

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